Are there any Telugu speakers in Mangalore

This story is from January 12, 2017

Teaching in Telugu leaves Andhra university students at a loss

TNN | Jan 12, 2017, 9:24 IST

Representative image.
VISAKHAPATNAM: The practice among lecturers at Andhra University to teach students in Telugu language has resulted in isolation of non-Telugu speakers and also an increasing inability among students to comprehend concepts when explained in English.
One of the oldest universities in south India, AU went through a stage of vernacularisation that coincided with the rise of language politics across the country. As a result, Telugu became the medium of teaching in certain departments and even now the tradition is followed.
A former rector and well-known teacher of AU, who is now retired, said, “AU had a vibrant cosmopolitan culture till the early 80s. It was only later that there was a shift to Telugu. A number of teachers also aided and abetted in the process and soon even lectures were being delivered in the vernacular language in many departments. This eventually forced students to opt for private institutions in the city.”
Another former professor of the AU College and Management Studies said, “Over the years the institution has definitely lost its sheen. There has been a significant fall from the days of Radhakrishnan and CR Reddy. Vernacularisation of the university coincided with the rise of private educational institutions and also a significant rise in politicising the environment, making the university a playground for political parties.”
As far as foreign students are concerned, they are completely clueless. Neither the Ethiopians nor the Nepalese understand much of what is being taught in the classroom and feel dislocated in the environment. However, the present day administrators are making a serious effort to ensure that there is a radical change, especially considering the fact that the present chief minister is actively promoting English and more so because AU in its attempt to go global has faced a serious soft skill crisis in its own right.
Vice-chancellor Prof G Nageswara Rao observed, “We are keen on making improvements on this front and the spade work was done by my predecessor Prof GSN Raju. Today we have a soft skill and communications department totally devoted towards improving the soft skills of teachers and students alike and deviation towards the vernacular during a lecture is being strictly prohibited.
Registrar Prof V Uma Maheswara Rao said, “There was never any kind of provincial or linguistic jingoism in AU. However, we have ensured that in an increasingly competitive environment one has to improve his/her skills, especially soft skills to easily teach or put forth a concept or idea. More importantly, this will also provide us with a larger and more competent student base.”
However, authorities including the vice-chancellor agreed that there has to be a major shift in the demographic composition in the university both at the teaching staff level as well as at the student level. “There is no doubt that we have to become more open in a globalised environment. Due to this reason alone we need to open our teacher and student base to a wider demographic and cultural range. But that would eventually depend on the state as well as our own will to become more self-sufficient and autonomous,” Prof Nageswara Rao said.
One of the oldest universities in south India, AU went through a stage of vernacularisation that coincided with the rise of language politics across the country. As a result, Telugu became the medium of teaching in certain departments and even now the tradition is followed

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