What is persuasion Who uses it

Persuasion is the use of appeals to reasons, values, beliefs, and emotions to convince a listener or reader to think or act in a particular way. Adjective: persuasive. Aristotle defined rhetoric as the "ability to discover the available means of persuasion" in each of the three kinds of oratory: deliberative, judicial, and epideictic.

"'Pop, what are you talking about?' the son screams.

"'We can't stand the sight of each other any longer,' the old man says. 'We're sick of each other, and I'm sick of talking about this, so you call your sister in Chicago and tell her.'.

Frantic, the son calls his sister, who explodes on the phone. 'Like heck they're getting divorced,' she shouts. 'I'll take care of this.'

She calls Phoenix immediately, and screams at her father, 'You are NOT getting divorced. Don't do a single thing until I get there. I'm calling my brother back, and we'll both be there tomorrow. Until then, don't do a thing, DO YOU HEAR ME?' and hangs up.

The old man hangs up his phone and turns to his wife. 'Okay,' he says, 'they're coming for Thanksgiving and paying their own way.'"
(Charles Smith, Just Plain Funny. RoseDog Books, 2012)

Pronunciation: pur-ZWAY-shun