Why did the English invent sport

Why did it fall the British to invent world wide sports

I was wondering what is so special about the British that they invented the world's sports?

Why didn't other nations do it?

I'm not talking about beach volley ball, or that swimming where women put pegs on their noses etc, I'm talking about proper sports.

I don't think the British invented Ice Hockey, although I would not be suprised if it was Brit in a foreign land.
I was wondering what is so special about the British that they invented the world's sports?

Why didn't other nations do it?

I'm not talking about beach volley ball, or that swimming where women put pegs on their noses etc, I'm talking about proper sports.

I don't think the British invented Ice Hockey, although I would not be suprised if it was Brit in a foreign land.
I don't know what or why, but thank you for football and modern boxing . Although I heard somewhere that footbal was invented in China some millenniums ago, and boxing was, we all know invented in ancient Greece, still, modern rules are invented in Britain. Maybe all those lords and knights had enough free time, so they made rules for some sports, just for fun
None of my favorite sports were invented by the British...
May 2011
14,137
Navan, Ireland
[ame="http://www.amazon.co.uk/Can-Have-Balls-Back-Please/dp/184614115X"]Can We Have Our Balls Back, Please?: How the British Invented Sport: Amazon.co.uk: Julian Norridge: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51cnTpy7BRL[/ame]

I have read sections of the above book and its enjoyable.

If I remember correctly basically Britain went through the Industrial Revolution first, this meant that not only did it become possible to travel between towns and cities but cities became large enough to have many teams.

Up to this point every town/village had its own versions of any sport. Cheap printing meant rules could be written down and transmitted easily.

So I think the first set of 'agreed rules' was set down in Australia--Aussie Rules but they were followed by an Association of London Football clubs who agreed on a set of rules, these were taken up by other towns--Soccer or association football.

I of course played for a club that used those rules set down at Rugby school.

Workers started to have a half day on saturday and so had the time to take part in such activities (the team Sheffield Wednesday was made up of shopworkers who had to work on saturday but had wednesday afternoons off).

The church encouraged first cricket (cric is the saxon word for stick and wicket is gate) in the summer and then football (of any rules) in the winter to keep young men 'out of trouble' and or the pub.

Factory owners often also approved and encouraged 'works' teams such as the military arsenel at Woolich or the foundary in West Ham.

At the time Britain was the greatest trading nation so the ideas spread-- Why is it AC Milan and Inter-Milan and not Milano?
What sports are you talking about?

American Football? - From English Rugby.

Baseball? - from English Rounders.

Or maybe you mean some other sport?
Coming "from" an English sport doesn't make them English. By that logic all sports came from Neolithic man throwing rocks back and forth.
Didnt the Brits invent:

Modern Soccer (the biggest sport)
Cricket (maybe the second biggest sport)
Tennis
Golf
Rugby
Good sportsmanship??
Can We Have Our Balls Back, Please?: How the British Invented Sport: Amazon.co.uk: Julian Norridge: Books

I have read sections of the above book and its enjoyable.

If I remember correctly basically Britain went through the Industrial Revolution first, this meant that not only did it become possible to travel between towns and cities but cities became large enough to have many teams.

Up to this point every town/village had its own versions of any sport. Cheap printing meant rules could be written down and transmitted easily.

So I think the first set of 'agreed rules' was set down in Australia--Aussie Rules but they were followed by an Association of London Football clubs who agreed on a set of rules, these were taken up by other towns--Soccer or association football.

I of course played for a club that used those rules set down at Rugby school.

Workers started to have a half day on saturday and so had the time to take part in such activities (the team Sheffield Wednesday was made up of shopworkers who had to work on saturday but had wednesday afternoons off).

The church encouraged first cricket (cric is the saxon word for stick and wicket is gate) in the summer and then football (of any rules) in the winter to keep young men 'out of trouble' and or the pub.

Factory owners often also approved and encouraged 'works' teams such as the military arsenel at Woolich or the foundary in West Ham.

At the time Britain was the greatest trading nation so the ideas spread-- Why is it AC Milan and Inter-Milan and not Milano?

So I think the first set of 'agreed rules' was set down in Australia--Aussie Rules but they were followed by an Association of London Football clubs who agreed on a set of rules, these were taken up by other towns--Soccer or association football
.

Association Football rules ( some of them) were formulated in Sheffield weren't they?

Sheffield Club formed in 1857 is recognised as the oldest club in the world, and Sheffield Hallam which still plays on it's original ground, is the second oldest. Both teams are still in existance. FIFA recognises the above fact.

I remember reading about British workers sent to build railways in South America. In their break time the natives were astonished to see the Brits kicking a ball about. A large crowd gathered and that was the start of football in South America.
May 2011
14,137
Navan, Ireland
What sports are you talking about?

American Football? - From English Rugby.

Baseball? - from English Rounders.

Or maybe you mean some other sport?
Wo invented 'Baseball' and if it came from 'rounders' was hotly debated in the late 19th century and beyond-- America wanted 'her own sport' .

But from the only book I have read on the subject

“ In Northanger Abbey poblished posthumously in 1818 but written about the turn of the century, Jane Austen wrote of her heroine that ‘.... it was not very wonderful that Catherine, who had by nature nothing very heroic about her, should prefer cricket, base ball, riding on horseback, and running about the country at the age of fourteen to books.’ A few years earlier, in 1796, a comprehensive German book on children’s games included 7 pages on the rules of das englische base-ball –English Baseball—which were the most detailed until the Knickerbocker Club rules of 1845. Half a century earlier , the well connected author Mary Lepel ,Lady Hervey, wrote about the behaviour of the family of the Prince of Wales; ‘In the winter, in a large room, they divert themselves at baseball, a play all who are, or have been, schoolboys are well acquainted with. Tha ladies,as well as the gentlemen , join in this amusement’ “

‘Can we have our balls back, please’ Julian Norridge pg 268


.

Association Football rules ( some of them) were formulated in Sheffield weren't they?

Sheffield Club formed in 1857 is recognised as the oldest club in the world, and Sheffield Hallam which still plays on it's original ground, is the second oldest. Both teams are still in existance. FIFA recognises the above fact.

I remember reading about British workers sent to build railways in South America. In their break time the natives were astonished to see the Brits kicking a ball about. A large crowd gathered and that was the start of football in South America.

Not sure about Sheffield will look it up in the book, I am no expert just read the book above sometime ago, was given it as a gift at Christmas and it was an ideal read in front of the tele falling asleep while waiting for the Queens speech or watching the Great Escape/Zulu/Von Ryans Express etc
Like that one about the cricketer coming out with a bat wider than the stumps